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IN THE GALWAY SILENCE

by Bruen, Ken

Ken Bruen has been called "hard to resist, with his aching Irish heart, silvery tongue, and bleak noir sensibility" (New York Times Book Review). His prose is as characteristically sharp as his outlook in the latest Jack Taylor novel, In the Galway Silence.

After much tragedy and violence, Jack Taylor has at long last landed at contentment. Of course, he still knocks back too much Jameson and dabbles in uppers, but he has a new woman in his life, a freshly bought apartment, and little sign of trouble on the horizon. Once again, trouble comes to him, this time in the form of a wealthy Frenchman who wants Jack to investigate the double-murder of his twin sons. Jack is meanwhile roped into looking after his girlfriend's nine-year-old son, and is in for a shock with the appearance of a character out of his past. The plot is one big chess game and all of the pieces seem to be moving at the behest of one dangerously mysterious player: a vigilante called "Silence," because he's the last thing his victims will ever hear.

This is Ken Bruen at his most darkly humorous, his most lovably bleak, as he shows us the meaning behind a proverb of his own design - "the Irish can abide almost anything save silence."

Ken Bruen received a doctorate in metaphysics, taught English in South Africa, and then became a crime novelist. The critically acclaimed author of twelve previous Jack Taylor novels and The White Trilogy, he is the recipient of two Barry Awards and two Shamus Awards and has twice been a finalist for the Edgar Award. He lives in Galway, Ireland.

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Kommentare

Bruen's enormous strength as a stylist. Stripped, bare, naked, it never fails to deliver a solid, devastating punch when one is required. Bruen has even invented a way to convey what a reader new to the series really should know in less than a page and fewer than two hundred words. As November comes around and Jack Taylor makes his annual reappearance, I usually wonder if this time Jack will at last be relieved of his Sisyphean tasks and rest. While I wish that Jack could at last find peace, I am always ready to accompany him on his endless circling of the sinkhole of despair.

Review: Reviewing the Evidence

Jack, as fans of this long-running series know all too well, has a gift for blarney, for plain speaking, for poetic melancholy, for downing shots of Jameson's without ice, and for pregnant one-word paragraphs ... A tough, tender, sorrowful tour of the Bruen aquarium, with all manner of fantastic creatures swimming in close proximity and touching only the fellow creatures they want to devour. Just don't get too attached to the supporting cast or read this installment just before a trip to Galway.

www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/ken-bruen/in-the-galway-silence/

Review: Kirkus

They don't come much tougher than Ken Bruen's Irish roughneck, Jack Taylor, a man with bad habits who does good despite himself.

www.nytimes.com/2018/11/16/books/review/newcomer-keigo-higashino.html

Review: New York Times Book Review

Jack Taylor cannot be happy. He says so himself, right there in chapter one of In the Galway Silence, the latest gruesome installment in the sordid life of Ken Bruen's ex-cop anti-hero. "I was happy," he says. Past tense. Anyone familiar with Bruen's cruel style knows that happiness for Taylor is usually a bad omen, a surefire generator of future suffering. Bruen is regarded as one of Ireland's premier noir writers, the "Godfather of the modern Irish crime novel," and the reasons is that his stories relentlessly depict a person who seems to literally live in Hell. Satisfaction, joy, fulfillment, these only multiply the intensity of the psychological and physical violence that awaits Jack in a Galway that acts as a microcosm of everything that is bad in our world. And it appears that all the world's misery finds its way into the world through Jack's bedraggled heart...

artsfuse.org/177375/book-review-in-the-galway-silence-another-tour-of-hell/

Review: ArtFuse

... In The Galway Silence is both Ken Bruen and The Jack Taylor series at it's best. Bruen examines his hero and his city with a styles that cuts to the marrow of both. Jack Taylor may not always be a likable character, but we wouldn't like him any other way.

mysterypeople.wordpress.com/2018/11/20/review-of-in-the-galway-silence-by-ken-bruen/

Review: Mystery People Blog

...I assure you that no one other than Ken Bruen is producing books quite like this, or quite this side of wondrous. He writes like an angel, a fearsome one such as he describes here, but one that you will want to keep and have close to you in order to appreciate your quiet and blessed life. A stunning experience from beginning to end, IN THE GALWAY SILENCE surpasses even Bruen's usual superlative standards.

www.20somethingreads.com/reviews/in-the-galway-silence-a-jack-taylor-novel

Review: 20Something Reads

[Bruen] writes like an angel, a fearsome one such as he describes here, but one that you will want to keep and have close to you...A stunning experience from beginning to end, In the Galway Silence surpasses even Bruen's usual superlative standards.

www.bookreporter.com/reviews/in-the-galway-silence-a-jack-taylor-novel

Review: Bookreporter

...Bruen's enormous strength as a stylist. Stripped, bare, naked, it never fails to deliver a solid, devastating punch when one is required. Bruen has even invented a way to convey what a reader new to the series really should know in less than a page and fewer than two hundred words. As November comes around and Jack Taylor makes his annual reappearance, I usually wonder if this time Jack will at last be relieved of his Sisyphean tasks and rest. While I wish that Jack could at last find peace, I am always ready to accompany him on his endless circling of the sinkhole of despair.

www.reviewingtheevidence.com/review.html?id=11225

Review: ReviewingTheEvidence

IN THE GALWAY SILENCE is chosen as one of the Best Crime Novels of 2018

www.nytimes.com/2018/12/21/books/review/best-crime-fiction.html

Quote: New York Times

In the way he delivers his often one or two word bullet sentences, Bruen sometimes writes like a slightly unhinged poet, the literary lovechild of Charles Bukowksi and James O'Toole, unofficial poet laureate of Henry Street, an area well known to the heroic Jack Taylor.

www.advertiser.ie/galway/article/104411/the-unhinged-poetry-of-ken-bruen

Review: The Galway Advertiser

...Taut plotting, a staccato first-person narrative, deeply flawed yet sympathetic characters and the windy, wet Irish milieu conspire to put Bruen's novels into a class by themselves.

bookpage.com/reviews/23342-ken-bruen-galway-silence-mystery-suspense#.XF2gAWaX_65

Review: Book Page

...There isn't another writer out there like Ken Bruen, and if there is then Bruen came first. Both Bruen and Taylor cut their own furrow in life. Taylor has to approach his cases in a certain fashion the Irish way. Head down, run hard at the target. Like him or loathe him, Taylor isn't bothered. And so too the author. There's a definite yeast extract (Marmite or Vegemite, you choose) element to Bruen's writing. You'll love it or hate it. He has a legion of loyal fans for good reason....

crimefictionlover.com/2018/11/in-the-galway-silence/

Review: Crime Fiction Lover

Powered by nonstop action and acerbic wit, [In the Galway Silence] is - like the pints of Guinness that the saga's existentially tortured, pill-popping antihero consumes on a daily basis - unfathomably dark. [Jack Taylor is] a deeply flawed but endearing character whose suffering is both tragic and transformative.

www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-8021-2882-9

Review: Publishers Weekly

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